This policy is to clarify the tone that Mumbrella hopes to achieve within our comment threads. We realise that only our members have the ability to create the type of community they want to belong to.

Mumbrella has received more than 100,000 comments over the last four years. The vast majority have contributed to the debate. A small proportion of those, most of which were never published, have not.

We feel this community is best served by allowing constructive criticism and robust debate. We also want to encourage discussion from the broadest possible range of people, from new entrants to the most senior. Everyone has a contribution to make.

While we have no wish to create an insipid comment environment, we think there is merit in considering how our actions affect others.

A community that feels threatened is, we feel, not one that can create brave work and take risks.

We currently accept comments from anonymous sources or under a pseudonym. We hold the view that allowing people to speak freely without fear of reprisal is in the interests of the whole industry. We recognise the reality that if we insisted that everybody identified themselves, practically would put off some while others would feel their roles precluded them from doing so.

However, anonymity should not be the cloak under which to troll or astroturf, and our ability to continue to allow anonymous comments could be jeopardised if the privilege of anonymity is abused. With borderline calls, we are less likely to publish critical comment where somebody has not chosen to identify themselves.

While we enjoy banter, it’s possible to be witty without being malicious.

Comments

Be respectful

Abusive, hateful or ad hominem personal attacks are not permitted. Comments should address the issue, not the person.

Be constructive

Stay on topic. How will your comment add to the debate?

Be concise (tl;dr)

Try to make your point in a couple of paragraphs. Excessively long comments risk not being read at all.

Be reasonable

We all work under constraints. Without seeing the brief or understanding the internal processes involved, you may not have a full understanding of a piece of work.