How it took TV viewers 90 seconds to fall in love with Junior Masterchef

The power of a good TV promo has been demonstrated by new research that suggests that a single trailer for Ten’s Junior Masterchef that ran during the final of Masterchef changed public sentiment about the show.

The research by the Ehrenberg-Bass Institute at the University of SA confirms comments by Ten programming boss David Mott who said that he took the decision to bring forward Junior Masterchef after the positive reaction to the promo.  

In August he said:

“We were completely blown away by the response to the sizzle I put in the finale, everyone’s been raving about it.”

And the Ehrenberg-Bass Institute research appears to back this up. Research associate Cathy Nguyen said: “We found, not only did the launch of the exciting new ad trigger a substantial spike in comments about Junior MasterChef, but also the discussions about the show became significantly more positive after the promo launch.”

She added: “Prior to the first promo, online comments about Junior MasterChef occurred at a fairly steady pace. After the launch of the ad however, the amount of comments escalated. And the increase was truly staggering – more comments had been generated in just the fortnight following the promo launch, than all the comments posted in the nine months prior.”

Junior_masterchef_buzz

She said that the research – which was done using social media tracking tool Nielsen BuzzMetrics – also saw the sentiment towards the show change from broadly neutral to much more positive after seeing the promo.

Junior_masterchef_sentiment

She said: “These research findings also show the value that a single program promotion can have on word of mouth, in turn highlighting the importance of TV promos in securing audience tune-in.”

The findings are the first stage of a larger project by the institute examining how word of mouth affects perceptions of new TV shows and how promos can be used to steer this.

Junior Masterchef goes on air at 7.30pm this Sunday.

Comments


  1. Dafitzfrom Oz
    8 Sep 10
    3:39 pm

  2. That’s the power of a little Robbie & Kylie action!

  3. PopCollar
    8 Sep 10
    4:04 pm

  4. is this a joke? are taxpayer dollars subsidising this ‘study’ of the bleedingly obvious? i thought at first that this ‘story’ was straight from a Nielsen press release

  5. John Grono
    8 Sep 10
    5:05 pm

  6. PopCollar, my understanding is that Ehrenberg Bass has a commercial offshoot. That is, if a commercial institution engages their services (i.e. TEN) then they pay.

  7. Hank
    8 Sep 10
    5:14 pm

  8. Excellent, so promos actually work and here’s me thinking the networks employed teams of producers out of the kindness of their hearts.

  9. Hmmmm
    9 Sep 10
    10:15 am

  10. If I want to watch dozens of stage-managed little brats being pushed by their psycho parents to achieve some modicum of fame, I’ll just dig up casting dvd’s from the last TVC I made with kids in it.

    This looks just awful. But hey, I’ve got no doubt it’ll pull in the MGB’s by the truckload, so it’ll be doing its job.

  11. macsmutterings
    9 Sep 10
    3:02 pm

  12. i must admit i am looking forward to watching this now, at first I thought “no way” but the promo’s have won me over. I’ll be giving it a go

  13. Verden
    9 Sep 10
    5:59 pm

  14. me too! the promo looks great!!

  15. R
    9 Sep 10
    6:18 pm

  16. What on Earth makes you think tax payer money was spent on research for Masterchef, PopCollar? Lol.

  17. Anonymous
    11 Sep 10
    2:44 pm

  18. lol@10:15 am!