F.Y.I.

Cancer Council relaunches campaign targets bowel cancer screening in Aboriginal West Australians

Cancer Council WA has relaunched a campaign urging Aboriginal West Australians to take the bowel screening test, in a bid to spark conversations about bowel cancer amongst the Aboriginal community.

The announcement:

Cancer Council WA has relaunched a campaign urging Aboriginal West Aussies to take the bowel screening test, in a bid to spark conversations about bowel cancer amongst the Aboriginal community.

Cancer Council WA’s cancer prevention and research director, Melissa Ledger, said the second wave of the campaign will run across social media until the end of June and will feature local Aboriginal people sharing their message to their community about the importance of bowel screening.

“Cancer Council WA is thrilled to be collaborating with Aboriginal people from across the State, including Elders and staff at Aboriginal Medical Services in the regions, for this campaign aimed at Aboriginal people talking about doing the test, and participating in the National Bowel Cancer Screening Program (NBCSP),” Ms Ledger said.

“The 2021 campaign got lots of Aboriginal people talking about bowel cancer screening online which was really exciting. We’re hoping for the same again this year, and that people are motivated to do their kits when they come in the mail or to reorder a free replacement.

“Bowel cancer is the third most common cancer affecting the Aboriginal Australian community but is one of the most treatable cancers if found early.

“The NBCSP has reported less than half of all eligible West Australians participate when they receive the home test kit which is designed to detect bowel cancer in its very early stages. When detected early, more than 90 per cent of bowel cancers can be treated successfully.”

Ms Ledger said the campaign was the result of extensive collaboration.

“We developed the campaign in consultation with Aboriginal Health Council of Western Australia and Derbarl Yerrigan Health Service. In the process, we also consulted with Aboriginal Medical Services, Elders, and Aboriginal staff from local clinics and organisations in the regions, including WA Country Health Service,” she said. We are lucky to have a great Aboriginal advisory group, and they gave us such good advice.

“We also teamed up with Mary G, an Aboriginal personality, educator, and radio presenter to raise awareness of bowel cancer amongst the Pilbara and Kimberley Aboriginal communities.

“Bowel cancer can develop with no symptoms, so screening is important.

“The test is quick, easy, and can be done in the privacy of your own home.

“As with all cancers, the earlier bowel cancer is found, the greater the chance of successful treatment.”

Because many areas across WA, particularly in the north are classified as ‘hot zones’ and samples may be damaged by heat, this campaign has been scheduled for the cooler months of June and July, with participants being encouraged to complete the testing process as soon as kits arrive.

Source: Cancer Council

ADVERTISEMENT

Get the latest media and marketing industry news (and views) direct to your inbox.

Sign up to the free Mumbrella newsletter now.

 

SUBSCRIBE

Sign up to our free daily update to get the latest in media and marketing.