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Rolling Stone to return to Australia

Rolling Stone magazine will return to Australia, almost a year after local rights holder, Paper Riot, went into liquidation.

Licence holder Rolling Stone International announced overnight it would increase its investment in the Asia Pacific region and the UK, which includes the Australian market.

Rolling Stone International is currently hiring in Sydney

It marks a return to print for Rolling Stone’s longest-standing international title, which was founded in 1972. In 2008, ACP – now known as Bauer Media – bought the title before selling it to Paper Riot and Rolling Stone Australia editor, Matthew Coyte.

However in January last year, doubt was cast over its future, after the parent company of the title, Paper Riot, went into liquidation.

At the time, Coyte told Mumbrella: “Paper Riot is in liquidation and will no longer be publishing Rolling Stone in Australia. The license has reverted back to the owner, Rolling Stone International. I can’t tell you what their plans are moving forward or make any further comment.”

Currently, Rolling Stone International is calling for staff writers and content creators in London, Sydney, Jakarta and Singapore, as part of the expansion.

Meng Ru Kuok, CEO of Rolling Stone International, said he wanted to strengthen the title’s position as a global authority, and focus more closely on local music culture and creativity.

“APAC is one of the world’s fastest-growing regions globally, representing a tremendous amount of musical talent and diversity. We see huge potential for further expansion and investment into our brand as well as solidifying our position within other key music markets like the UK.

“We’re investing in editorial and launching dedicated digital experiences because we understand the critical importance of having local journalists with their fingers on the pulse of local music scenes.

“We’re excited to be building a team of relevant, experienced voices on local music, culture and entertainment to dig up unique stories for a wider global audience,” Kuok said.

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