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Big Bash second innings draws 983,000 metro viewers while Back Roads draws 762,000

The second innings of the Big Bash match between the Hobart Hurricanes and Melbourne Renegades drew 983,000 metropolitan viewers last night.

Gayle batting during last night's Big Bash match in Hobart.

Chris Gayle batting during last night’s Big Bash match in Hobart.

Session 2 out-rated session 1 of the match, played out of Hobart, which drew just 857,000 viewers across the five cities, meaning almost one million people witnessed Chris Gayle’s controversial interview with Ten reporter Mel Mclaughlin, where he made a pass at her.

The result came on a summer night when audiences remained weak with no show, outside of news, drawing more than one million viewers and the ABC’s Back Roads, hosted by Heather Ewart, again performing strongly with 762,000. 

According to Oztam Preliminary Ratings, Back Roads almost claimed the title of most watched program outside of news and sport but was beaten narrowly by a repeat episode of Border Security which drew 771,000 viewers in the 7:00pm slot.

In the 7.30pm time slot repeats of Big Bang Theory on Seven beat repeats of To Catch a Smuggler on Nine. The geeky US comedy show pulling 688,000 at 8:00pm and 623,000 at 7.30pm compared with 623,000.

Ten’s highest rating program of the night was The Project with 561,000 viewers in the 7:00pm time slot.

In the 8.30pm time slot Seven’s movie 50 First Date drew 526,000 while Nine’s Good Will Hunting attracted 437,000.

In the news race, Seven beat Nine with 1.048m in the 6:00pm slot compared with 1.008m; however, Nine then secured the 6.30pm time slot with 1.30m to 1.006m.

The strength of the Big Bash lifted the Ten Network, which had an 18.3 per cent share on its main channel last night, pushing it to win the night. Second best was Nine, narrowly beating Seven with 18 per cent compared with 17.9 per cent, while the ABC had 14.1 per cent.

Data OzTAM Pty Limited 2015. The Data may not be reproduced, published or communicated (electronically or in hard copy) in whole or in part, without the prior written consent of OzTAM.

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