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Michelle Grattan resigns from The Age

Michelle Grattan at her press conference earlier today.

One of Australia’s leading political reporters Michelle Grattan has resigned from The Age to a position of professorial fellow with the University of Canberra.

In her new role she will continue to operate as a journalist, writing for The Conversation as the website’s associate editor (politics) and chief political correspondent and commenting in radio and television.

A spokesman from the University of Canberra, this morning, confirmed to Mumbrella that Grattan will resign from her role as political editor of The Age to take up the role.

Already some of Grattan’s colleagues have commented on the departure. The AFR’s Phil Coorey this morning tweeted:

Other press gallery colleagues have also paid tribute:

Tweets from some of Grattan’s press gallery colleagues.

Grattan will hold a press conference at 12pm today at Parliament House but in a statement issued this morning the press gallery veteran said she was please with the move.

“I am delighted to be associated with the University and look forward to contributing to its academic life, and especially to engaging with its students, while being able to continue to pursue political journalism”, said Grattan.

Editor of The Conversation Andrew Jaspan said: “I am truly delighted and honoured to be working again with Michelle. I thoroughly appreciated her advice, professionalism and acute political savvy while working with her at The Age. She epitomises the very best in political journalism.”

Grattan’s new role will see her guest lecture, write and also take on an advisory role with the university.

Nic Christensen

The announcement:

Michelle Grattan, who is currently the political editor of The Age newspaper, will take on a diverse role which will include teaching and research projects in politics and political communication, lecturing, public commentary and strategic advice.

Alongside her academic role, and with the agreement of the University, she will continue as a practising journalist, joining The Conversation as Associate Editor (Politics) and Chief Political Correspondent and commenting in radio and television.

The University has admired Michelle Grattan’s contribution to her profession for many years, and in 1994 recognised this with an honorary doctorate from the University.

Professor Parker said: “I am delighted to welcome Michelle Grattan to the University of Canberra.

“She will add to our contemporary and real-world teaching and research and be an invaluable source of advice.”

Michelle Grattan said “I am delighted to be associated with the University and look forward to contributing to its academic life, and especially to engaging with its students, while being able to continue to pursue political journalism”.

Andrew Jaspan, editor of The Conversation and former editor of The Age said “I am truly delighted and honoured to be working again with Michelle. I thoroughly appreciated her advice, professionalism and acute political savvy while working with her at The Age. She epitomises the very best in political journalism.

“Stephen Parker, the VC at Canberra University, has made this happen and we are indebted to his commitment to quality journalism and academic leadership.  And because we publish everything under Creative Commons every other media outlet is free to share and republish Michelle’s journalism. As with any national treasure, she is too good not to be shared.”

Professor Grattan will give guest lectures and tutorials at UC and advise Professor Parker and colleagues. She will also work on research projects, including research in political communication for the University’s ANZSOG Institute for Governance.

She has already agreed to give a public lecture in the National Security series run by former chief of army Professor Peter Leahy, the director of the University of Canberra National Security Institute and also a professorial fellow.

Professorial fellowships are awarded by a number of universities to public figures who join academic life after making an extraordinary contribution in their professional career, which is equivalent to becoming a full professor.

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