eBay ad spoofs the price-matching promises of David Jones

Online retailer eBay has launched a spoof campaign that mocks the claims made in a press campaign by David Jones.

The eBay attack-ad highlights the conditions DJs attaches to the promises it makes in its price-matching policy, which eBay says does not extend to online retailers, liquidation sales or clearance stock. The ad headline reads, “Our promise: always staying one step ahead of the Joneses.”

The David Jones press campaign ran in the Sydney Morning Herald last week.

David Jones price-matching policy ad

“We think Australian shoppers are smarter than that and if you offer a promise it needs to be real and not qualified – we don’t think that consumers need to be the ones to do all the heavy lifting when it comes to getting a good deal,” said Sandy Culkoff, eBay Australia and New Zealand’s head of communications.

The campaign was created by Leo Burnett Sydney with media by PHD.

Comments


  1. JP
    7 Nov 11
    11:33 am

  2. Good call by eBay – just highlights that you don’t get to choose who your competitors are – your consumers do that all for you!

  3. KB
    7 Nov 11
    11:45 am

  4. Another great tactical piece from eBay Australia; captalising on Australian’s growing shopping habits. Can’t wait for the Christmas campaign.

  5. Daniel
    7 Nov 11
    12:16 pm

  6. Not the first example of eBay taking on retailers head-on… http://www.danielbowen.com/201.....et-retail/

  7. blahchacha
    7 Nov 11
    2:18 pm

  8. Excellent! Love.

  9. CP
    7 Nov 11
    4:03 pm

  10. Awesome,let’s keep sending our money offshore.I’m sure it’ll be happier there.If we keep shopping at DJs they’ll just keep employing Australians!

  11. Anonymous
    7 Nov 11
    4:56 pm

  12. ^great username

  13. Steph
    7 Nov 11
    5:09 pm

  14. @CP Because everything you buy at David Jones is Australian, right?

  15. Anonymous
    7 Nov 11
    5:18 pm

  16. eBay one of the biggest and fastest growing companies in the world today – picking on David Jones one of Australia’s oldest businesses as it struggles to keep its head above water.
    What a tragically bad joke! Give me Miranda Kerr any day!
    Surely eBay could find something good to say about itself without making ads about the disclaimers in other ads.
    Pathetic!

  17. Karlos
    7 Nov 11
    5:20 pm

  18. If DJ’s had a website and that at least offered a great browsing experience and backed it up with awesome service and then tried to work on a strategy to compete against the cheaper overseas pricing they might get somewhere. Something that it repeated far too often in Australia.

    Australian online consumers are so far ahead of the large Australian retailers it is not funny.

  19. Anonymous
    7 Nov 11
    10:54 pm

  20. Ebay has nothing better to do than create spoof ads. I can’t take them seriously. David Jones is an Australian icon – it’s nice to see them going the extra step and looking after it’s customers.

  21. Bob
    7 Nov 11
    11:37 pm

  22. But you can’t buy anything big on Ebay as its too risky – can’t be sure the seller will back up their promises .. eg. like a warranty on whitegoods etc

  23. POP
    8 Nov 11
    12:19 pm

  24. @BOB, I buy all my whitegoods from eBay, Most of the time its cash when you pick them up, hell Ive even bought a kitchen on there. Love both DJs & eBay but I hate fine print so good on eBay!!

  25. Rob
    8 Nov 11
    8:19 pm

  26. @Bob How long have you worked for DJ’s Bob?

  27. buggo
    9 Nov 11
    4:41 pm

  28. DJs can get served like this because they have failed to move with the times. A prehistoric e-commerce site, sales where they wheel out designer rags from 1998 still sitting at 50% off covered in make-up and sweat – hardly the hallmarks of a forward thinking company.

  29. Andrew
    10 Nov 11
    9:08 am

  30. Its history repeating itself when theatre was threatened by silent movies, or live performances threatened by the gramophone, either adapt or disappear.
    if you don’t understand the technology, you cannot adapt as seen by David Jones or Harvey Norman.