News

Veritonic and Acast research shows the power of programmatic podcast advertising

New global research from audio analytics and research platform Veritonic, and the world’s largest independent podcast company Acast, has broken down the best practices in programmatic podcast advertising.

The research took a look at the common tactics and differences in this form of podcast advertising across the US, Australian and New Zealand, and EMEA.

By looking at podcast ads sourced programmatically through Acast across various genres — automotive, tourism, retail, healthcare, entertainment —  they studied ad length, number of voiceovers, gender of voiceover, use of sound effects, call to action placements, and more.

“As an industry there is still a lot of myth-busting to do around programmatic ad buying,” said Elli Dimitroulakos, Global Head of Ad Innovation at Acast.

“At Acast, we firmly believe that programmatic advertising should not be a rigid experience for the media buyer, podcast host, and certainly not the listener. Podcast advertising is effective because it’s a seamless part of the listening experience and that shouldn’t change based on how a transaction occurs.

“Programmatic ads can – and should – have creative elements that enhance the listener experience and brand relationship.”

The research shows the majority of ads were a minimum of 30 seconds in length, with  56% of programmatic ads running at least 30 seconds long in Australia and NZ. The remaining 44% in the market were 15 seconds in length.

“Acast has pioneered automated buying in podcasting for a long time and it’s an area of our business in Australia that is growing very fast,” explains Managing Director for Australia & New Zealand, Henrik Isaksson.

“There is no difference in quality in an audio ad bought directly via our sales team or one that is traded in an automated fashion.

“A large share of digital ads are traded programmatically in Australia and as we continue to invest in partnerships and technology we stay true in our mission to support podcasters’ hard work no matter how big or small they are.”

 

“Hope is not a strategy; it’s no longer enough for a brand to create an audio asset and simply hope it’ll move the needle,” said Scott Simonelli, CEO of Veritonic.

“Having confidence that your marketing efforts and investments will pay off is crucial, especially in today’s economy.”

ADVERTISEMENT

Get the latest media and marketing industry news (and views) direct to your inbox.

Sign up to the free Mumbrella newsletter now.

 

SUBSCRIBE

Sign up to our free daily update to get the latest in media and marketing.